i am davidbrothers dotcom

went to sleep real
woke up realer

email me. tweet me. i am.

July 28, 2014 at 9:31pm
37 notes

THIS IS ME SITTING NEXT TO MIXMASTER MIKE, SHORTLY AFTER MURS SAID LAZARUS, A BOOK I EDIT BY RUCKA & LARK, IS ONE OF HIS FAVORITE COMICS UNPROMPTED

MY LIFE IS DOPE

(Source: instagram.com)

1:43pm
80 notes

For years now, comics have gotten lost in the noise of Comic-Con — but this year felt like the worst example of that. The comic-book companies seemed to have a harder time than ever breaking through the clutter, and there weren’t really a lot of big announcements. We got more details about Spiderverse and Grant Morrison’s Multiversity, but a glut of alternate universe stories didn’t feel especially fresh at this point.

— 

The Biggest Winners And Losers Of Comic-Con 2014!

I wish I knew which staffer wrote this paragraph, because I’d love to sit them down and tell them why they’re wrong. I was at the show this year and all I saw were people excited as HECK for comics. I spoke to several rooms packed FULL of people, with lines around the corner, who wanted to see Image creators. I was on a manga panel where a crowd of people cheered or gasped or laughed at our choices for best and worst manga. I personally spoke to several dozen of people a day who wanted to read Rocket Girl or Lazarus or Deadly Class or Kung Fu Bible Stories. I watched Jasons Aaron and Latour blow through their signing lines. I watched Scott Snyder hustle to make sure the fans were right. I watched Kelly Sue DeConnick do her thing with aplomb at what seemed like every single moment of the show, and I watched Chip Zdarsky and Matt Fraction make a couple hundred people a day smile goofily. People kept telling me how good the panels were and how it made them fans of authors they’d never heard of before. One cosplayer said that sneaking her into the Saga signing made her whole weekend.

And that was just the experience of one man working one booth. Boom! was hopping. Fantagraphics looked great. Vertical had some of the best books at the show.

If you were at SDCC and you don’t think comics had a fantastic presence, if you’re judging the significance of comics through whatever announcements to buy things that aren’t out yet came through, you need to adjust your sights. You’re aiming in the wrong direction.

Judge it by the smiles, not the capitalism.

1:27pm
141,522 notes
Reblogged from buzzfeed

(Source: BuzzFeed, via wendyshadah)

12:52pm
435 notes
Reblogged from iamdavidbrothers

"diversity marketing" →

super-heroine:

iamdavidbrothers:

The other week I lost my temper and said some stuff about Marvel’s announcements of Captain America and Thor, who are replacing White Captain America and Dude Thor. I’ve been thinking about it a lot, mulling it over, because it’s been pretty inescapable.

I like Marvel’s characters. I think that…

And I think it’s messed up to see somebody who doesn’t know that pain harness it to sell some comics. ”

This has been on my mind for a while now, but especially because of all the new announcements.  Do we wait to tell these stories until a writer/artist team with an authentic voice is finally hired, or do we write these stories now with the hopes that they will show young readers that superheroes can come in all colors and designs?  How do we get past this “lesser of two evils” situation that is reoccurring in media, especially comics.  

It is always better to take the leap than wait for someone else, on a personal level. But I think companies that have hiring power have a responsibility to do some legwork to make sure it gets done and done well. There’s no story you shouldn’t be allowed to tell, but be aware that others may tell it differently than you are currently capable of. But DO IT either way.

10:45am
435 notes

"diversity marketing"

The other week I lost my temper and said some stuff about Marvel’s announcements of Captain America and Thor, who are replacing White Captain America and Dude Thor. I’ve been thinking about it a lot, mulling it over, because it’s been pretty inescapable.

I like Marvel’s characters. I think that much is obvious. I like the creators, too. I might quibble with some story details, but big whoop. That’s the smallest thing ever, “I don’t like this specific aspect of a comic that isn’t being written for me.” No me importa, basically. But it’s the marketing that’s killing me, and I think I figured out why.

Marvel’s making moves to increase the character diversity in their books, and drawing ire from the usual gang of idiots. Which I’m all for, even though I’m way more for creator diversity, and believe is a good thing. But the thing that’s grating is that instead of putting the work out on its own merits and marketing it about how great it is, a lot of the conversation around it has been about the basics that hate it.

I’ve been seeing Marvel folks, mostly white dudes but not entirely, retweet or address or bring up racists and scumbags and sexists while pushing their books, positioning themselves as taking a stand against these people talking trash.

They’re hijacking hate to a certain extent, in the Situationist sense, and are using it to market their comics. The new black Captain America, the new lady Thor, both of these announcements were followed, within minutes, by people talking about the people who are hating on the project. “Big ups to all my haters!” is such a soft position, because it positions you as good because these other people are worse.

On top of that, it also colors the reaction to the announcement. If you disagree with whatever for genuine reasons, but you phrase it as “I don’t like that the Falcon is Captain America,” the reaction to that is now tilted heavily toward “Oh, what’re you, racist?” instead of it being something more reasonable. By putting those people front and center, by tweeting about them and giving interviews about how you won’t change the project no matter the response because you believe in your stuff, you’re…it’s not ham-stringing criticism, but it’s definitely preempting it, in a way.

And I think that’s the gross part. I spend a lot of time consciously pushing back against the messages society tells me about being black. The unworthiness, the laziness, the dumbness…all of it’s fake. But I have to stay on the ball, I have to keep Black Is Beautiful in the front of my mind, because black IS beautiful, and it always has been, and it always will be.

But I remember being in kindergarten and getting called nigger on the playground. I remember fachas screwing with me and my friends in Spain. I remember getting followed around stores, people looking at me like I don’t belong, and getting ignored when trying to do my job because there’s a white dude next to me who people assume is the boss of me. This weekend I got confused for a few other black dudes in comics who I don’t even resemble, and it stings every time.

And I think it’s messed up to see somebody who doesn’t know that pain harness it to sell some comics. That’s what’s been grossing me out, that’s what I haven’t been able to properly articulate. It’s the corporate version of dudes crowing about how feminist they are, like being a decent human being means they deserve groupies. “One episode of The Wire, what you know about dope?” right? And I feel like Marvel gets it on a certain level, and they certainly employ people who get it, but they don’t get it yet.

Somebody calling you a nigger ain’t a badge of honor. You don’t show off your gunshot wounds. You don’t crow about how people hate you in the name of making yourself look good. You let the dead bury the dead and leave the garbage men in the rear view or in the ground. They should not matter to you or me not nary an inch.

That’s why it feels like diversity-as-marketing to me. The creative teams are killer, and I like that Marvel is putting the full weight of their machine behind these books. I respect the people creating the comics. But I can’t take seeing people be proud of getting hated on in a way that doesn’t hurt them but forces me to think about how crap and dangerous it is to be black (or anything else) and alive in America in 2014.

Stay woke.

(link to this post on 4thletter!, with comments turned on, if you want to talk it out)

7:43am
66 notes

cosplay

I’m in bed on Monday after getting home from SDCC at near midnight, procrastinating on a shower by vanity googling by searching “image panels” and whatnot on Twitter. I’m weak and only capable of this at the moment:

At SDCC, I ran AV on one panel (including doing…let’s call it a three-minute “bit” to warm the crowd up), guested on two, and moderated four more. I kept up with my day job while at the show, helped work signings at the booth, and generally played floater for the team—what needs doing, how can I help? I’m pretty well wiped out.

Cosplayers, though. I don’t have a count—my phone is just far enough out of reach but within sight that not counting is probably lazy—but I took selfies with a bunch of them, and I played rock-paper-scissors with somewhere between fifteen and thirty of them as part of a super-fast manga giveaway at one panel. They’d come by the booth to show their stuff off or I’d catch them in the hallway and be surprised at how dope their costume looks.

They showed up to the panels I was moderating, too. I think cosplay is real cool, personally, and I have friends who do it. I also think cosplayers get a lot of guff sometimes, from marks who are mad the costumes aren’t 100% to scrubs who are mad because…whatever. So at my panels, I tried to make it a point to thank the cosplayers, to give them a round of applause from a room with a couple hundred people in it, to hook them up with free stuff, because they deserve it. Even if it’s just a “dope costume!” on the way to a panel or hotel or something, I try to let it be known. Compliments are free, yadadamean? So why be stingy with them? If you don’t say dope costume, who will?

I respect enthusiasm. And there can be so much work and anxiety involved in putting on a costume and going to a show that I respect cosplay and cosplayers a whole lot.

Showertime.

7:16am
455 notes
Reblogged from flatbear

delcat said: "Dude" actually has gender-neutral origins dating back to the 1870's. It didn't become associated with men until the 1960's. That's ninety years of gender neutrality! It's kinda neat.

jennirl:

flatbear:

WHAT THAT’S AWESOME! Thank you, etymology side of tumblr!

petition to reclaim dude from the dudely masses.

petition cosigned

"I’m a dude. He’s a dude. She’s a dude. We’re all dudes, hey!" —Good Burger, laying the foundation for positive change

July 27, 2014 at 3:42pm
18 notes

OutKast - Humble Mumble

"Life is like a great big roller coaster/ Everything in life don’t always happen like it’s suppose to/ Trials and tribulations make you stronger, live longer/ You wanna reach the nation, nigga, start from ya corner/ Everything don’t always happen like you planned it/ Demand it, overstand it, then you handle it/ Fuck wishing, you missing the ambition on your mission"

too strong.

3:41pm
147 notes
Reblogged from iamdavidbrothers
brooksbraswell:

kierongillen:

iamdavidbrothers:

Duck face with Kelly Sue at #selfiegocomiccon with a #wicdiv photobomb

I am retweeting this whilst sitting in the corridor of a Holiday Inn in Scotland, because my wife is asleep and I don’t want to write in the room.
I AM JEALOUS.

that next level dbros duck face
you have to outshine everyone on everything, don’t you, david?

I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT A DUCK’S FACE EVEN LOOKS LIKE

I JUST WINGED IT

brooksbraswell:

kierongillen:

iamdavidbrothers:

Duck face with Kelly Sue at #selfiegocomiccon with a #wicdiv photobomb

I am retweeting this whilst sitting in the corridor of a Holiday Inn in Scotland, because my wife is asleep and I don’t want to write in the room.

I AM JEALOUS.

that next level dbros duck face

you have to outshine everyone on everything, don’t you, david?

I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT A DUCK’S FACE EVEN LOOKS LIKE

I JUST WINGED IT

3:39pm
23 notes
Reblogged from kierongillen

Anonymous said: I'm listening to Wicdiv-inspired 8track playlists while sketching new original characters, which shall hopefully get me back into writing. Let's buckle down and hope I can finally muster up something like a work ethic.

kierongillen:

Link them up, anonymous!

And yes, onwards! Let’s see if we can all be powerful keyboard heroes for the rest of the year.

WE CAN AND WILL

3:16pm
3 notes

you gotta click on the girl to make it work

July 26, 2014 at 10:05am
18 notes
"Hey, great! Can I watch you have it?"

"Hey, great! Can I watch you have it?"

7:45am
90 notes

Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira, issue three.

I was flipping through this just now, doing that rapid spacebar move to flick through pages until something catches my eye, and I noticed something I hadn’t before. Do you see it? Kaneda is a bulldozer.

7:39am
9,052 notes
Reblogged from funkblues

Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira (1988)


I can find something to love in every scene of Akira (the falling glass, a bouncing helmet full of blood, lights appearing out of the silent darkness), but this is…this made a big impression on me as a kid. It’s still one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen, especially when combined with the previous moment, where Kaneda leaps off the back of someone else’s bike, hits the ground running, and then ruins this guy’s life. It’s so thugged out. This might’ve been The Moment of the movie for me.

Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira (1988)

I can find something to love in every scene of Akira (the falling glass, a bouncing helmet full of blood, lights appearing out of the silent darkness), but this is…this made a big impression on me as a kid. It’s still one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen, especially when combined with the previous moment, where Kaneda leaps off the back of someone else’s bike, hits the ground running, and then ruins this guy’s life. It’s so thugged out. This might’ve been The Moment of the movie for me.

7:29am
47 notes

petty

A couple years ago, at a con, I asked a question of a company’s CEO on their panel. He hemmed, he hawed, and he eventually just said, paraphrasing, “You’re the only one that cares about this. We don’t care about this. Customers don’t care about this. It’s not feasible.” I felt some type of way about it because it was obviously a blatant lie, and the pushy fake friendliness that followed from their PR department didn’t help either.

This week, they announced what I’d been asking for.

I copped your shit.

Now I break weed up on it.